Latest Sprint cellphone rumor is a Rumor cellphone Apple Patents The Invisible Button The Huffington Post Starts To Give Out Badges To Readers In The Face Of Falling Ad Revenues, AOL''s Armstrong Says: "We Are Hustling As Fast As We Can" The Return Of The Lost iPhone May Come On June 7, WWDC Day Tremor Media Shakes Another $40 Million Out Of The VC Money Tree Graphic.ly Wants To Blow Your Mind Away With Digital Comics (Video Demo) Google Believed To Pay Up To $25 Million For LabPixies To Flood The Web With Apps Blinkx Starts Targeting Video Ads At Yoga Moms And Infonauts (Video Interview) MyLikes Brings Pay-Per-Video Advertising To YouTube Google Street View Adds Local Business Listings In Its Local Brawl With The NYT, The WSJ Pulls Out Some Foursquare Badges Blogger Commerce Network OpenSky Fetches $6 Million Series B Palm Shake-Up Imminent, Rubinstein May Be Out Palm Shake-Up Imminent, Rubinstein May Be Out Arctic Explorer Eric Larson Becomes First Person To Tweet From The North Pole CrowdEye Adds Location And Sentiment Filters To Realtime Search Are Like Buttons Evil? The Open Web Reacts To Facebook''s Not-So-Open Graph For men on trains: Japanese company sells anti-groping gloves Japan''s $2 million rescue robot is a hummingbird Thanko sells USB-powered "Hot Cat Gloves" Japan gets another set of those "Crazy Earphones" eneloop music booster: Sanyo''s battery charger for music devices Location-Based Mobile Advertising Platform AdLocal Enters America, Wants To Win With Japan Know-How TDK develops method to tint touchscreens HA-FX700: JVC''s wooden (and pricey) earphones PyramidTalk: Seiko updates their cult clocks from the 1980s Sharp develops efficient solar cells for use in outer space Panasonic officially owns Sanyo and boasts the world''s largest plasma panel plant now Meet Nippon Institute of Technology''s cool humanoid (video) LifeBook MH380: Fujitsu''s new netbook with Pine Trail processor New cell phone maker NEC-Casio goes America, targets 200% international sales boost GR DIGITAL III × STUSSY: Ricoh unveils limited edition point-and-shoot camera TechCrunch Giveaway: Brand New Lytro Camera And Free Ticket To Disrupt NY #TCDisrupt TechCrunch Giveaway: Nike+ Fuel Band Plus 2 Free Tickets To The #Crunchies TechCrunch Giveaway: Two Tickets To The Crunchies Awards #Crunchies TechCrunch Giveaway: Nexus 4 And Nexus 10 #TechCrunch Gift Guide Giveaway: A Brand New Lytro Camera #LytroMeTC Today Is The Last Day To Nominate Your Favorites For The 6th Annual Crunchies Awards TechCrunch Giveaway: iRobot Roomba 650. Get Clean For The Holidays #TechCrunch More Tickets Released For Detroit And Chicago Meetups Weather Puppy: Cloudy With A Chance Of "Awww" TechCrunch Giveaway: A New Samsung Chromebook #TechCrunch TechCrunch Giveaway: Free Tickets To Box''s 2012 #BoxWorks Event TechCrunch Giveaway: 3 More Vizio Co-Stars! #TechCrunch Here Are Your TechCrunch Disrupt SF Battlefield Startups From Day 2 Here Are The TechCrunch Disrupt SF Battlefield Startups From Day 1 Giveaway: New Relic Has Four More Free Disrupt SF Tickets For All You #DataNerds TechCrunch Giveaway: Kindle And Free Ticket To Disrupt SF #TCDisrupt UpTo Brings Its Social Calendar To Android, Signs A Deal With The Cleveland Cavaliers
漂流瓶终于彻底拜拜 微信7.0.4新版体验
微信漂流瓶被玩坏了 聊聊漂流瓶里那些事
微信关闭漂流瓶 它曾经满足了我们对世界的好奇
微信暂停漂流瓶功能:对色情内容零容忍
[视频]惠普Chromebook x360 14 G1评测:搭载Chrome OS的商务变形本
特斯拉:北京客户可三年免息融资购车并免费租赁车牌
借贷宝:停止催收百名裸条女大学生 未满23岁将不得借贷
京东白条多地频现盗刷 消费者遭催收公司“逼债”
借款野蛮催收行为将被规范 真是几家欢喜几家愁
为规范网贷催收 上海互金协会发行业倡议书
腾讯解释为什么微信没有夜间模式 真相你相信吗?
一张发行8年的微信唱片:只收录了4首歌曲


漂流瓶终于彻底拜拜 微信7.0.4新版体验
微信漂流瓶被玩坏了 聊聊漂流瓶里那些事
微信关闭漂流瓶 它曾经满足了我们对世界的好奇
微信暂停漂流瓶功能:对色情内容零容忍
[视频]惠普Chromebook x360 14 G1评测:搭载Chrome OS的商务变形本
特斯拉:北京客户可三年免息融资购车并免费租赁车牌
借贷宝:停止催收百名裸条女大学生 未满23岁将不得借贷
京东白条多地频现盗刷 消费者遭催收公司“逼债”
借款野蛮催收行为将被规范 真是几家欢喜几家愁
为规范网贷催收 上海互金协会发行业倡议书
腾讯解释为什么微信没有夜间模式 真相你相信吗?
一张发行8年的微信唱片:只收录了4首歌曲


Why Location-Based Services Will Create Multiple Winners At The Application Layer
为什么基于位置的服务将在应用层创建多个优胜者

当前位置: 艾金森 > 门户 > 新闻

点击量 2
编辑: 1   作者: Techcrunch   时间: 2018/11/1 7:19:59  

Editor’s Note:?TechCrunch?columnist?Semil Shah?currently works at?Votizen?and is based in Palo Alto. You can follow him on Twitter?@semil

Location, location, location. Whether you’re a real estate agent, a traveler, or building mobile applications, location matters a great deal. As far as phone sensors go, the GPS sensor appears to be one of the most coveted by developers, after the camera. For a consumer, the trade is quite simple: offer your location at a specific point in time, or your patterns, and in exchange for that information, an application will offer you something - a deal, a coupon, or information about who and/or what is around you.

It’s been chronicled before, but bears repeating: In the great race to grab a person’s location, there are many entities who could already map out interesting - and spooky - data about our whereabouts. For those of you using plastic to buy things, your credit card companies know where you purchase items, and for those living in the future with Square Card Case, they know, too. The cell phone carriers that charge you monthly fees for questionable signals certainly know your location, as do the handset makers and those who make operating systems on those phones. And, the big social networks - Facebook and Twitter - know our whereabouts, as well, capturing data about us every time we log a status update on the go.

Of course, en masse we don’t fully trust these kind of entities with our location data, even though they hold the keys to it. As a result, this has created an opportunity for developers to build software systems at the application layer to extract a user’s location in exchange for something useful, delightful, or both. It has been discussed endlessly “why” these applications want your location, but I want to take a slightly different tack - let’s explore “how” they go about getting that data, as well as the challenges and opportunities it presents to all participants.

There are three main ways a mobile application can collect your location data: (1) via explicit signals, such as checking in at a location (e.g. Foursquare); (2) via implicit signals, such as revealing your location at a specific point in time when you take a specific action (e.g. capturing a picture using Instagram); or (3) via passive data collection, or tracking, where the application works in the background to grab your location, whether or not you are actively using that application (e.g. Highlight).

Obtaining this location information is not easy work. Despite this, my belief is that there isn’t just one type of “location” that users create, and that because of these different types of location that we can generate, map, and broadcast, the “location category” can and will likely produce multiple winners, some with potentially big outcomes.

One of the biggest surprises of Facebook acquisition of Instagram is that we realized how much access Instagram had to location data that Facebook can now tap.?While Instagram did an incredible job innovating around the camera software and social engagement features, they were also able to briefly capture a user’s location implicitly at the time an image was captured, so much so that if you took an Instagram at a Giants game and then clicked on the location-stamp, you could see a kaleidoscope of other Instagrams from the same ballpark.

The mindspace around mobile location at the application layer is currently owned by Foursquare, a company and product that, in my opinion, is one of the best mobile applications out there. Like Instagram, it is on my iPhone home screen. Everyone knows that Foursquare collects your location data when you explicitly inform the application that you’d like to check-in at a particular place. By creating an addictive game around this behavior, Foursquare also built out a database of places on the backs of gallivanting users, additionally encouraging them to broadcast their whereabouts into other social networks, as well as leaving tips for others and creating checklists for yourself. I now use the app for as my primary tool for local searches on the go, benefiting from others’ location data, behaviors, and recommendations.

Some products work to passively collect location data. These include Highlight and Glympse, among others, as well as apps used to help people track items or other people, find their friends, or track their children, such as ?Lookout and Footprints, among others - and also creeps people out more. While great software technologies are present today, battery degradation seems to be roadblock today, though one would have to imagine that battery performance will get better eventually and widen opportunities in this space.

Which each type of location data collected, there is a trade between the application and user- in exchange for being able to filter and share my photographs, Instagram knows where I am; in exchange for unlocking rewards or broadcasting that I'm at a cool place, Foursquare knows where I am; and in exchange for alerting me as to who may be around, Highlight grabs my location, too. I’ve been willing to offer my location to each of these applications, though I’d argue it’s not a relationship to take for granted - the product has to generate enough usefulness in order for me to continue using it.

Ultimately, I believe there will be winners in each “type” of location data collection, and some could be large outcomes, most likely through M&A. There are also new apps emerging, such as?Pinwheel?and Kullect, that could disrupt the current leaders. Despite the fact that these applications have yet to uncover robust business models (a common yet misplaced gripe), they could be incredibly valuable to larger companies (or even handset makers) who want to act on this data but don’t want to be seen as grafting it without permission.

Certain segments of consumers seem likely to trust applications with their location data, rather than larger platforms, but the tricky part is that consumers may grow suspicious if their location apps fall into the hands of larger entities they don't trust as much.?This is what *could* happen with Instagram now that it is in the hands of a powerful and capable owner, though by the looks of my Twitter feed, the rate of Instagrams is only increasing. For the moment, both Facebook and Twitter's mobile apps don't naturally incorporate location data into the mobile experience, which in turn creates opportunities for startups to help fill the void. This seems to indicate that for the right mobile product experiences, some consumers will continue to offer their location, and the developers building these applications have many great prizes to pursue.

Photo Credit: psd on Creative Commons / Flickr